Oxford study finds virtual reality can help treat severe paranoia | University of Oxford

The patients who fully tested out their fears in virtual reality by lowering their defences showed very substantial reductions in their paranoid delusions. After the virtual reality therapy session, over 50% of these patients no longer had severe paranoia at the end of the testing day.

There were even benefits for those who confronted situations they feared in virtual reality while still using their defences: around 20% of this group no longer having severe paranoia at the end of the testing day.

Source: Oxford study finds virtual reality can help treat severe paranoia | University of Oxford

The digital game that could cure TB – BBC News

A team of undergraduates from Abertay University in Dundee has created Sanitarium, a game that invites people to play doctor.Using scarce resources they must treat as many TB patients as they can.

Behind the game lies a mathematical model developed at St Andrews University that uses data from human interactions to simulate a drug trial. The data collected by the game could help deliver new drug treatments to the developing world quicker and cheaper than ever before.

Source: The digital game that could cure TB – BBC News

15 Professions That Are Using Games for Training | Mental Floss

6. NursingWhile surgeons can benefit from games, game developers haven’t forgotten about nurses. Some hospitals have programs where staff can simulate responses to various emergencies or care situations. The goal is to increase the standard for patient safety and minimize human error.

7. Electronics and Appliance RepairPutting the right part in the right place takes a lot of experience and knowledge of hundreds of different models. Technicians can get an opportunity for repetitive practice by “dropping” parts into specific areas on a machine using a cursor.

Source: 15 Professions That Are Using Games for Training | Mental Floss

This Interactive System Lets Doctors See Your Guts in Virtual Reality | Motherboard

True 3D uses DICOM data, the same format used by every MRI scan, CT scan, or ultrasound image. With that data, EchoPixel renders interactive, 3D virtual objects that can, as founder Sergio Aguirre told Motherboard, allow individuals to “explore, dissect and share.”EchoPixel allows doctors to see certain patient structures—such as polyps or lesions—more clearly, and assess their potential harm. Aguirre said they can also develop a detailed surgical plan that takes into account complex interactions of arteries and other structures in the body, without having to hand-draw them. Surgeons will also be able to practice a procedure on an anatomically accurate model of the patient, which isn’t possible with current technology.

Source: This Interactive System Lets Doctors See Your Guts in Virtual Reality | Motherboard