What Roleplaying Teaches Writers | Tor/Forge Blog

The most important thing we learn from pen-and-paper roleplaying games is that anyone can be a storyteller. Books, movies, TV, video games—all of these can inspire a would-be writer, but the audience’s role is still fundamentally passive. These media are fun, but do nothing to fill the chasm separating us from creative “professionals”: the gulf between “Wow, that was cool,” and “I want to do what they did!” At the end of the day, we’re still standing outside the dream factory looking in.

Roleplaying games burst right through that wall, Kool-Aid-Man style. By their very nature, RPGs force audience members to take control, to see themselves as storytellers. RPGs are improv, and even the best-written adventure module is still only a stage for the participants. Creativity is mandatory, and as people game, they come to identify as creative. I can’t count the number of professional authors I’ve met who were drawn into writing by the urge to create more elaborate backstories for their characters, or settings for their game, or journals of their parties’ adventures. Gaming breeds writers like salad bars breed bacteria.

Source: What Roleplaying Teaches Writers | Tor/Forge Blog

(4) Psychology: What are the different types of psychological needs that game developers fulfill to make video games fun? – Quora

There’s an enormous amount of diversity in what people enjoy. We all have different psychological needs for what we find “fun”.

Game developers that understand these needs can gain an advantage in their designs. However, I would argue that these advantages transcend far beyond just video games and are already used in other industries.

via (4) Psychology: What are the different types of psychological needs that game developers fulfill to make video games fun? – Quora.

IEEE Xplore Abstract – Assessing Knowledge Retention of an Immersive Serious Game vs. a Traditional Education Method in Avi…

Thanks to the increasing availability of consumer head-mounted displays, educational applications of immersive VR could now reach to the general public, especially if they include gaming elements (immersive serious games). Safety education of citizens could be a particularly promising domain for immersive serious games, because people tend not to pay attention to and benefit from current safety materials. In this paper, we propose an HMD-based immersive game for educating passengers about aviation safety that allows players to experience a serious aircraft emergency with the goal of surviving it. We compare the proposed approach to a traditional aviation safety education method (the safety card) used by airlines. Unlike most studies of VR for safety knowledge acquisition, we do not focus only on assessing learning immediately after the experience but we extend our attention to knowledge retention over a longer time span. This is a fundamental requirement, because people need to retain safety procedures in order to apply them when faced with danger.

IEEE Xplore Abstract – Assessing Knowledge Retention of an Immersive Serious Game vs. a Traditional Education Method in Avi….

What’s next for open source? Physical products. | Opensource.com

In the same way open source has spawned millions of careers and thousands of companies, imagine the opportunity with openness applied to products. It could potentially jumpstart a revolution in how we conceptualize, build, and share things and how we experiment and innovate to push the boundaries of science and technology.

via What’s next for open source? Physical products. | Opensource.com.

10 DIY Arcade Projects That You’ll Want To Make – Make: | Make:

10 DIY Arcade Projects That You’ll Want To Make – Make: | Make:.

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Seemingly gone are the days riding your bike down to the local mall, wolf-down a slice of pizza, and then hit the Arcade to drop every quarter (or tokens) you had into a slew of games. Gaming consoles sounded the death knell for arcades as they began to dominate the industry starting in the early 80’s and by the late 90’s, most arcades were all but gone. The dawn of the 21st century brought with it affordable and easy to use development boards and other electronics, which makers used to build their own games, essentially bringing the arcade into their own homes. Makers have made everything from tabletop machines to full-on cabinets to bring back the nostalgia that once was and this roundup is just a few of the unique builds that are popping up in homes all over the world.