Why Preserving Old Computer Games is Surprisingly Difficult | Mental Floss

The process is not wholly unlike archaeology. Sometimes engineers even stumble upon hidden messages within a game’s code. For instance, while restoring Dungeon Keeper, GOG employees found a note written by the game’s original creator and lost for nearly twenty years, which thanked his employees for their many sleepless nights building the game: “This game has been written with a passion I am proud to be a part of. I do not just hope you like it, I also hope you are aware of the huge amount of work we have all done.”

Source: Why Preserving Old Computer Games is Surprisingly Difficult | Mental Floss

What Happens When Kids Can Hack Physical Play? | UX Magazine

That’s where Hackaball comes in. The creation of London-based “innovation accelerator” Made by Many, Hackaball is a durable, croquet-ball-sized sphere that kids can program via iPad to respond with light, sound, and vibration. Kids are invited to use the ball’s functionality to create their own games and use cases (imagine the cathartic wonders of an alarm clock that you can turn off by throwing it against a wall).

Source: What Happens When Kids Can Hack Physical Play? | UX Magazine

Shake That Button (W.I.P) | A website about alternative controllers, video game installations and playful performances

Shake That Button is a website documenting alternative controllers, video game installations and playful performances (to sum it up : games exploring new physical ways to play). It wants to be a resource for the makers, the players and the curators as well.

Source: Shake That Button (W.I.P) | A website about alternative controllers, video game installations and playful performances

A dicey proposition: why video gamers should also get into board games

The problem with video games is that there’s generally not much to show. Your Steam library may be massive, but it’s just not the same as owning something physical.Board games scratch that itch for something tangible.Forget those games of the past that look like they were designed by an accountant. Modern board games just look plain good.For around the same price as the latest AAA title, you can get an awesome box with all kinds of objects to play with: funky dice, colourful cards, beautiful boards and miniatures…so many miniatures.So while board games may not deliver the same graphical experience that video games do, they stand on their own as attractive physical objects.

Source: A dicey proposition: why video gamers should also get into board games

Google’s new Cardboard experiences convinced me VR is here to stay

\When Cardboard was announced last year, it was largely seen as a fun experiment so anyone can try out virtual reality on the cheap, but with an SDK, hardware certification program, iOS support and now Jump and Expeditions, it’s clear Google wants to make VR a meaningful part of our everyday lives. It says a lot that two of my favorite VR experiences so far happened using a $20 piece of paper with a couple of lenses.

Source: Google’s new Cardboard experiences convinced me VR is here to stay

How to Turn Your PC (or Other Device) Into a Retro Arcade with Lakka

If you’re looking for a fun way to use an old PC, Lakka can turn it into an amazing retro gaming machine. This easy setup doesn’t require any advanced Linux knowledge, and you can even use the controllers you already have lying around. Here’s a step-by-step guide to making your own all-in-one retro arcade in no time.

Source: How to Turn Your PC (or Other Device) Into a Retro Arcade with Lakka

This library lets you borrow a sledge hammer – Boing Boing

“Real sharing means not owning something, or owning it collectively,” Gjertsen said. “And there aren’t tons of mechanisms to do that easily. One of the reasons I think it’s difficult is, because for as many times as people have suggested I ought to take this idea and turn it into a mobile app, I firmly believe the idea is too interpersonal to live purely on the web.”

Source: This library lets you borrow a sledge hammer – Boing Boing

What’s next for open source? Physical products. | Opensource.com

In the same way open source has spawned millions of careers and thousands of companies, imagine the opportunity with openness applied to products. It could potentially jumpstart a revolution in how we conceptualize, build, and share things and how we experiment and innovate to push the boundaries of science and technology.

via What’s next for open source? Physical products. | Opensource.com.

Lego Dimensions transports your bricks and Minifigs into a video game

Lego Dimensions transports your bricks and Minifigs into a video game.

If there was any doubt that video games that allow kids to bring their physical toys into the actual game were more than just a fad, Lego and Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment are joining the likes of Nintendo’s amiibo, Disney’s Infinity, and Spin Master’s Sick Bricks with its new Lego Dimensions game for the PS3, PS4, Xbox 360, Xbox One, and Wii U.